[Chiffres] Le pic des exportations (de pétrole)

Modérateurs : Rod, Modérateurs

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Tiennel
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 5020
Inscription : 12 mars 2005, 00:37

[Chiffres] Le pic des exportations (de pétrole)

Message par Tiennel » 14 déc. 2007, 21:51

Sur la base des stats BP, j'ai compilé les exportations des 26 premiers producteurs de brut mondiaux (hors Irak, Angola, Oman et Nigeria, soit 83% de la production mondiale). Cela donne le graphe suivant :

Image

Ce fameux "pic des exportations" n'est donc pas encore passé, et ce d'autant plus qu'une partie de la "consommation" des pays producteurs est en fait du raffinage dont les produits sont exportés. Mais je laisse à quelqu'un de plus patient que moi le soin d'aller recueillir ces données pour affiner l'analyse :-P
Dernière modification par Tiennel le 15 déc. 2007, 13:42, modifié 2 fois.
Méfiez-vous des biais cognitifs

Avatar de l’utilisateur
energy_isere
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 59708
Inscription : 24 avr. 2005, 21:26
Localisation : Les JO de 68, c'était la
Contact :

Re: Le pic des exportations

Message par energy_isere » 15 déc. 2007, 00:56

Tiennel, ca va pas durer longtemps.
Lis cet article dans Le New York Time :
Oil-Rich Nations Use More Energy, Cutting Exports

The economies of many big oil-exporting countries are growing so fast that their need for energy within their borders is crimping how much they can sell abroad, adding new strains to the global oil market.

Experts say the sharp growth, if it continues, means several of the world's most important suppliers may need to start importing oil within a decade to power all the new cars, houses and businesses they are buying and creating with their oil wealth.

Indonesia has already made this flip. By some projections, the same thing could happen within five years to Mexico, the No. 2 source of foreign oil for the United States, and soon after that to Iran, the world's fourth-largest exporter. In some cases, the governments of these countries subsidize gasoline heavily for their citizens, selling it for as little as 7 cents a gallon, a practice that industry experts say fosters wasteful habits.

"It is a very serious threat that a lot of major exporters that we count on today for international oil supply are no longer going to be net exporters any more in 5 to 10 years," said Amy Myers Jaffe, an oil analyst at Rice University.

Rising internal demand may offset 40 percent of the increase in Saudi oil production between now and 2010, while more than half the projected decline in Iranian exports will be caused by internal consumption, said a recent report by CIBC World Markets.

The report said "soaring internal rates of oil consumption" in Russia, in Mexico and in member states of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries would reduce crude exports as much as 2.5 million barrels a day by the end of the decade.

That is about 3 percent of global oil demand. It may not sound high, but experts say demand for oil is so inflexible, and the world has so little spare production capacity, that even small shortfalls can raise prices. In 2002, when a labor strike in Venezuela took 3 percent of global production off line, oil prices spiked 26 percent within weeks.

The trend, though increasingly important, does not necessarily mean there will be oil shortages. More likely, experts say, it will mean big market shifts, with the number of exporting countries shrinking and unconventional sources like Canadian tar sands becoming more important, especially for the United States. And there is likely to be more pressure to open areas now closed to oil production.

Greater political stability and increased drilling in some important oil states, notably Iraq, Iran and Venezuela, could help offset the rising demand from other oil exporters.

"Ten years from now, world capacity to produce oil could be 20 percent higher than today" said Daniel Yergin, chairman of Cambridge Energy Research Associates. "But a lot will depend on how the geopolitics work out."

Growth in demand among oil exporters is one aspect of a larger issue, breakneck economic growth in parts of the developing world. China and India are expected to account for much of the increase in global oil demand in the next 20 years. But Fatih Birol, chief economist at the International Energy Agency in Paris, rated consumption growth among oil exporters as the second-biggest threat to meeting the world's oil needs.

"It's a big problem, and growing all the time" Mr. Birol said.

Internal oil consumption by the five biggest oil exporters - Saudi Arabia, Russia, Norway, Iran and the United Arab Emirates - grew 5.9 percent in 2006 over 2005, according to government data. Exports declined more than 3 percent. By contrast, oil demand is essentially flat in the United States.

CIBC's demand projections suggest that for many oil countries, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait and Libya, internal oil demand will double in a decade.

Factors contributing to the trend include increased industrialization, higher government spending and increasing personal consumption. According to a World Bank report, economic growth in the Middle East and North Africa has doubled since the 1990s, and Russia has done even better.

Oil money is giving many countries the means to invest in their own economic development, and robust global growth is creating markets for their goods - including plastics, chemicals and fuels refined from oil.

To be sure, many oil-exporting states have a long way to go before they achieve Western living standards. The global oil market is still dominated by traditional consumers, particularly the United States, which uses nearly a quarter of the world's oil.

Perhaps surprisingly, though, some producing countries have surpassed the United States in oil consumption per person. They include Bahrain, Kuwait, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates.

Particularly in oil-producing countries with large populations, like Indonesia, Russia and Mexico, a rapid rise in car ownership is a big factor driving consumption increases. Russian farmers are replacing horses and carts with gas-guzzling four-wheel-drive vehicles, while urban consumers are snapping up BMWs even before they learn to drive.

"Most of the producing countries have young populations entering the driving age and can more readily afford to buy cars because the price of fuel is low"said Charles McPherson, an oil expert at the International Monetary Fund. "It's certainly pulling product off the international markets"

Some oil-exporting countries use price controls and subsidies to ensure cheap fuel for their people. These programs are politically popular, even though experts say they contribute to wasteful energy use.

Kuwaitis, for instance, often leave their air conditioning -powered by electricity generated from natural gas or oil-derived fuels - running for weeks while on vacation, said an official at the World Bank. Sportsmen of the United Arab Emirates ski indoors on manufactured snow and play golf on lush courses that require desalinated water produced with fuels refined from oil.

Saudis, Iranians and Iraqis pay 30 to 50 cents a gallon for gasoline. Venezuelans pay 7 cents, and demand is projected to rise as much as 10 percent this year. Auto sales have tripled in four years. 'Where cheap oil is viewed as a national human right, you've virtually got runaway demand," said Chris B. Newton, an executive of the Indonesian Petroleum Association in Jakarta.

Indonesia flipped from exporting oil to importing it three years ago because of sagging production in depleted fields and rising demand. Iran, Algeria and Malaysia are vulnerable in the next decade. Most oil experts view Mexico as the next country likely to flip, in as little as five years.

Rapidly falling production in Mexico's aging Cantarell oil field is part of the problem. Also significant, though, is the rising number of cars on Mexican roads. They have nearly doubled, to almost 16 million, in the last decade, and gasoline consumption is growing 5 percent a year.

In Mexico City the other day, a bricklayer named Jaime Guerrero arrived at a local Chevrolet dealership. His extended family cried "bravo!" as he signed the papers for his first car.

"To have a new car in my name is a dream transformed into reality," said Mr. Guerrero, 26. He and his family piled in and weaved through the chaotic traffic of the capital, hunting for a priest to douse the car with holy water.

"I don't worry about the climate or shortages of oil in the world," Mr. Guerrero said. "I just worry if gasoline prices go up."
Source :
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/09/busin ... j7uKNA4/1Q

Avatar de l’utilisateur
energy_isere
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 59708
Inscription : 24 avr. 2005, 21:26
Localisation : Les JO de 68, c'était la
Contact :

Re: Le pic des exportations

Message par energy_isere » 15 déc. 2007, 01:21

Tiennel

je te laisse plonger dans l' excellente analyse de EnergyBulletin, ici : http://www.energybulletin.net/22213.html de Nov 2006
[An assessment of world oil exports

by Luís de Sousa

Oil Exports

This article is a first simplistic assessment of World Oil Exports, here defined has the total amount of liquid hydrocarbons that are surpluses in producing countries. This assessment is made by projecting in to the future fixed change rates that reflect current trends in liquids production and consumption in countries where presently the difference between the two is positive. The outcome of this assessment is worrisome.
c'est TRES long (29 écrans) , et ca détaille pays par pays.

la conclusion est
Conclusions

This assessment should be taken "with a grain of salt", it is not to be expected that the future will follow these projections. But looking at these numbers, some trends clearly arise, the most important being a decline from 2005 onwards of the amount of oil coming to the market. This situation is a consequence of consumption growth at higher pace than production in most of the oil exporting countries.
c' est à dire que pour l' auteur 2005 serait le pic exportations de pétrole.

Tes chiffres d' exportations pour les années 2000 à 2005 ont l' air elevés comparés à ceux de l' article. :?

Jägermeifter
Condensat
Condensat
Messages : 750
Inscription : 26 juin 2005, 19:10

Message par Jägermeifter » 15 déc. 2007, 01:27

Je ne suis pas d'accord. Dans ton graphe, tu prends la les exportateurs d'aujourd'hui.

Les Etats Unis étaient aussi exportateurs, tous comme l'Indonésie, la Grande Bretagne ou tous les pays qui ont déjà connus leur pic et sont devenus importateurs. Ce graphique ne donne qu'une image de ce qu'ont dans la passé exporté les pays qui sont aujourd'hui exportateur.

Cela fausse tout. Dans 10 ans, tu auras un graphique du même genre car du coup, l'Iran et le Mexique seront supprimés, et tu peux continuer longtemps, en supprimant un a un les pays qui deviennent importateurs.

De plus, trace la consommation asiatique à coté, car l'affaire n'est pas seulement de quantité disponible, mais de quantité disponible par rapport à la demande.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Tiennel
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 5020
Inscription : 12 mars 2005, 00:37

Message par Tiennel » 15 déc. 2007, 10:32

Pas tout à fait, je regarde l'évolution de la production de 30 producteurs mondiaux, et je ne totalise que leurs exportations. Il y a certes un biais : je considère qu'aucun producteur important n'ait disparu du top 30 depuis 1985, ce qui me paraît peu probable.

De toute façon, ne croyez-vous pas qu'un pic des exportations (correctement corrigé des exportations en produits pétroliers) franchi en 2005 aurait déclenché une crise de l'offre qui n'a rien à avoir avec ce que nous voyons en ce moment (un baril très légèrement renchéri) ?
Méfiez-vous des biais cognitifs

Avatar de l’utilisateur
lionstone
Gaz naturel
Gaz naturel
Messages : 917
Inscription : 08 avr. 2005, 18:40
Localisation : nulpart

Message par lionstone » 15 déc. 2007, 12:01

Dans ce graphique c'est la Russie et le Mexique qui vont être déterminant dans les années à venir.
Moderacene: le site de la moderation brut

Jägermeifter
Condensat
Condensat
Messages : 750
Inscription : 26 juin 2005, 19:10

Message par Jägermeifter » 15 déc. 2007, 13:12

Tiennel a écrit :De toute façon, ne croyez-vous pas qu'un pic des exportations (correctement corrigé des exportations en produits pétroliers) franchi en 2005 aurait déclenché une crise de l'offre qui n'a rien à avoir avec ce que nous voyons en ce moment (un baril très légèrement renchéri) ?
La crise de l'offre est la, avec une hausse inimaginable pour les officiels il y a 3 ans.
Je crois que le pic ressemblera à ce que nous vivons actuellement, avec un pourrissement lent de la situation pour certains pays (Europe, USA entre autre), le renforcement du pouvoir politique de certains pays (Russie, Venezuela, certains états du Golfe) au détriments d'autres (dont nous faisons malheureusement partie). La situation sera très différente selon les pays, il y aura des gagnant et des perdants.
Je crois que nous serons loin de la fin du monde dans le froid et la nuit, comme certains semblent aimer à croire. D'ailleurs, entre 1975 et 1985, les exportations se sont réduites d'un bon tiers sans famine généralisée ni guerre mondiale.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Environnement2100
Hydrogène
Hydrogène
Messages : 2493
Inscription : 18 mai 2006, 23:35
Localisation : Paris
Contact :

Message par Environnement2100 » 15 déc. 2007, 13:27

Jägermeifter a écrit : Je crois que le pic ressemblera à ce que nous vivons actuellement, avec un pourrissement lent de la situation pour certains pays (Europe, USA entre autre),
Il me semble que tu sous-estimes la capacité d'action des états modernes ; je te rappelle que la France a franchi son pic de consommation en 1976, c'est-à-dire qu'il lui a fallu moins de trois ans pour prendre des décisions, les appliquer, obtenir des résultats. Les Etats-Unis, on l'oublie trop souvent, ont déjà des limitations de vitesse absurdement basses pour un pays de cette taille qui n'a pas de TGV : ils sont capables de beaucoup de choses, ne serait-ce que parce que leur industrie automobile est moribonde, et lancer le renouvellement de 200 miliions de véhicules est une source de rétablissement économique considérable.
le renforcement du pouvoir politique de certains pays (Russie, Venezuela, certains états du Golfe)
Oui, sauf le Vénézuela, dont le pouvoir politique aujourd'hui est proche de zéro, et qui le restera : l'Iran ou le Royaume d'Arabie Saoudite me paraissent des gens plus crédibles.
au détriments d'autres (dont nous faisons malheureusement partie). La situation sera très différente selon les pays, il y aura des gagnant et des perdants.
Je crois que nous serons loin de la fin du monde dans le froid et la nuit, comme certains semblent aimer à croire.
Bien sûr. Même le RC ne nous cuira qu'à petit feu.
D'ailleurs, entre 1975 et 1985, les exportations se sont réduites d'un bon tiers sans famine généralisée ni guerre mondiale.
Les exportations de ?
Trop de mépris entraîne des méprises - Phyvette, ca 2007.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Tiennel
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 5020
Inscription : 12 mars 2005, 00:37

Message par Tiennel » 15 déc. 2007, 13:40

Il y avait effectivement quelques erreurs dans la base de données. Voici un nouveau graphe, correspondant à 83% de la production 2006 :
Image
Pays pris en compte :
Saudi Arabia
Russian Federation
USA
Iran
China
Mexico
Canada
United Arab Emirates
Venezuela
Norway
Kuwait
Algeria
Brazil
United Kingdom
Kazakhstan
Qatar
Indonesia
India
Malaysia
Argentina
Egypt
Azerbaijan
Colombia
Ecuador
Australia
Méfiez-vous des biais cognitifs

Jägermeifter
Condensat
Condensat
Messages : 750
Inscription : 26 juin 2005, 19:10

Re: Le pic des exportations

Message par Jägermeifter » 15 déc. 2007, 13:56

energy_isere a écrit :Tiennel

je te laisse plonger dans l' excellente analyse de EnergyBulletin, ici : http://www.energybulletin.net/22213.html de Nov 2006
Graphique tirée de cette page :
Image
Figure 23 – Total Oil exports from the assessed countries, including the projections for the 2006 – 2020 period.

Cela, couplé à la croissance chinoise, c'est très mauvais pour nous petits européens.
Image
Comparaison de la consommation et production pétrolière au oyen Orient. Consommation pétrolière asiatique donnée à titre indicatif.

Jägermeifter
Condensat
Condensat
Messages : 750
Inscription : 26 juin 2005, 19:10

Message par Jägermeifter » 15 déc. 2007, 14:03

Je ne suis pas si sur que le Venezuela ait un pouvoir politique si faible mais bon, ce n'est pas le propos de ce fil.
Environnement2100 a écrit :
D'ailleurs, entre 1975 et 1985, les exportations se sont réduites d'un bon tiers sans famine généralisée ni guerre mondiale.
Les exportations de ?
Exportations mondiales (voir graph ci dessus, provenant d'EB).

Avatar de l’utilisateur
hyperion
Hydrogène
Hydrogène
Messages : 1724
Inscription : 18 juin 2005, 19:36
Localisation : herault

Message par hyperion » 15 déc. 2007, 14:10

si,si c'est aussi le propos du fil
l'arabie saoudite utilsait deja presque 2 mbj en 2004, et c'est un pays qui n'a tjs pas passé sa transition demographique.
l'iran est en tout cas tres credible, ce qui est en même temps dangereux pour lui. il est fort possible que sa population qui a fait la transition demo mette au pouvoir des personnels qui permettent son evolution sans frein international
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9310601#
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17180695homéo niet secu, preservatifs , vaccin hepati b nourisson et chaussures oui oui; Buzin, pas besoin de lui faire de cadeau; dogmatique à virer et au boulot!

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Environnement2100
Hydrogène
Hydrogène
Messages : 2493
Inscription : 18 mai 2006, 23:35
Localisation : Paris
Contact :

Message par Environnement2100 » 15 déc. 2007, 14:14

hyperion a écrit :si,si c'est aussi le propos du fil
l'arabie saoudite utilsait deja presque 2 mbj en 2004, et c'est un pays qui n'a tjs pas passé sa transition demographique.
AMC les chiffres de l'AS sont à prendre avec des pincettes, puisque ce pays raffine pour ses voisins ; voir le fil sur l'OAPEC qui donne pas mal de chiffres là-dessus. Quand tu vois les prix de vente de l'essence dans ces pays, tu te dis que cette croissance de consommation est un peu artificielle, ou fragile si tu préfères.
Trop de mépris entraîne des méprises - Phyvette, ca 2007.

Jägermeifter
Condensat
Condensat
Messages : 750
Inscription : 26 juin 2005, 19:10

Message par Jägermeifter » 15 déc. 2007, 14:49

Sur ce sujet des consommations des pays exportateurs et du pic d'exportations de pétrole,, je vous conseille la lecture des articles de TOD:
http://www.theoildrum.com/node/3018
http://www.theoildrum.com/node/2767

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Tiennel
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 5020
Inscription : 12 mars 2005, 00:37

Re: Le pic des exportations

Message par Tiennel » 15 déc. 2007, 15:45

energy_isere a écrit :Tiennel

je te laisse plonger dans l' excellente analyse de EnergyBulletin, ici : http://www.energybulletin.net/22213.html de Nov 2006
Décidément, les belles couleurs de TOD vous plaisent ! Il faudra que je pense à vous offrir des pâtes multicolores pour Noël :)
Image
Cette "excellente" analyse qui prévoit le pic des exportations pour 2005 utilise des prévisions (autrement dit, des chiffres inventés) pour la période 2006-2020.

C'est assez facile à ce moment-là de faire une "analyse" prévoyant le pic sur 2005 :roll:

Mes courbes sont moins jolies, mais mes données 2006 sont réelles :smt019

Mais j'ai bien conscience qu'une analyse restreinte à 83% du périmètre n'est pas suffisante pour conclure que le pic des exportations n'est toujours pas franchi. Je réfléchis à une méthode pour réintégrer les quelques pays clés qui manquent (Irak, Nigeria, Lybie, etc) - pays-clés que l'analyseur de spaghetti de TOD n'a pas d'ailleurs pris en compte non plus, si j'en crois la légende de son graphe.
Méfiez-vous des biais cognitifs

Répondre