[Pétrole] Sables bitumineux (du Canada)

Modérateurs : Rod, Modérateurs

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Djian
Goudron
Goudron
Messages : 163
Inscription : 07 avr. 2005, 15:20
Localisation : Liège (BE)

[Pétrole] Sables bitumineux (du Canada)

Message par Djian » 07 sept. 2005, 10:10

Les prix semblent suffisamment élevés pour attirer les investissements dans cette direction..... mais est-ce énergétiquement rentable????

Voici un article qui montre l'intérêt pour cette source alternative de pétrole (chère, très chère, le cheap-oil est bel et bien derrière nous):

CALGARY -- Teck Cominco Ltd. will be the first mining company to take a major role in the oil sands, paying $475-million for part of the Fort Hills project in a deal that also sets a new benchmark for asset prices in the booming region.

"We get just a huge level of expertise [from Teck]," said Brant Sangster, senior vice-president of oil sands at Petro-Canada, majority owner of Fort Hills. "We don't have to go out and try to find it in a world where that expertise is pretty sparse. And, don't forget, we're 100 kilometres north of Fort McMurray. [Teck] has built [mines] on the tops of mountains in Peru and in the northwest of Alaska."

Teck, which mines for zinc, copper and coal, announced yesterday it is joining the $5-billion Fort Hills project in two transactions to gain a 15-per-cent stake. It is receiving 5-per-cent stakes from Petrocan and minority partner UTS Energy Corp. for $250-million and a third 5-per-cent stake from UTS in the second deal worth $225-million.

Petrocan and UTS's strategy to bring in a mining partner was saluted by financial analysts as innovative and sensible. It could also start a new trend in the oil sands, an area where mining for tar-like bitumen has always been conducted in-house by oil companies themselves.


Teck's acumen in open-pit mining in harsh climates means Petrocan and UTS can realistically get Fort Hills producing 100,000 barrels a day starting in 2010, said Steven Paget, an analyst at FirstEnergy Capital Corp.

"Mining expertise is going to be key," Mr. Paget said.

Companies that might consider a mining partner include Total SA, which is buying Deer Creek Energy Ltd., Mr. Paget said.

The idea has arisen before. In 1998, Shell Canada Ltd. joined forces with miner BHP Billiton Ltd. of Australia to assess Muskeg River, an oils sands project near Fort McMurray that is now in production.

However, BHP gave up in early 1999, dropping out when the price of oil wasn't much higher than $10 (U.S.) a barrel.

But even if there are several more Teck-like deals, the prevailing strategy of energy companies developing their own mining expertise is unlikely to radically change. Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. has planned its giant $10.8-billion (Canadian) Horizon project for several years and is going ahead with its own mining operation.

Syncrude Canada Ltd. and Suncor Energy Inc., operators of the two biggest mining projects, also do their own shovelling.

"It's something we've done since day one," said Brad Bellows, a Suncor spokesman. "We consider ourselves to be the experts in oil sands mining."

Teck's $475-million move also sets a new standard for prices of oil sands assets, some of which just last year were available for pennies a barrel of bitumen in the ground. Prices were kept low by the general impression among investors and energy companies that high oil prices were unlikely to last and worries that mining projects were too expensive.

"The whole sector has been really quite undervalued, when you consider the current commodity price," said William Roach, president and chief executive officer of UTS Energy Corp. "This is just a recognition by the market that these assets are valuable. There's little exploration risk and it's a huge resource -- and it's right next door to the biggest market in the world."

The industry and investors are simply "getting more comfortable" with the oil sands, said William Lacey, another analyst at FirstEnergy Capital.

"Sure, prices have gone up a lot but they were ridiculously cheap before," Mr. Lacey said. "You were paying a nickel for a barrel in the ground. And it's still pretty cheap. When you're buying it for less than $2 a barrel, in a $60 [U.S.] oil environment, that's pretty intriguing."

Another sign of intense interest in the oil sands is the takeover of upstart Deer Creek Energy, which in early August accepted a $1.35-billion (Canadian) offer from France's Total. Deer Creek said late last week that it had received another offer -- the bidder was kept confidential -- and Total agreed to match it, pushing the price tag up almost 25 per cent to $1.67-billion.

The Teck deal was received warmly by investors. Class B stock of Teck rose $1.54 or 3.1 per cent to $50.71 on the Toronto Stock Exchange yesterday. UTS rose 36 cents or 8.7 per cent to $4.48. Petrocan stock fell 90 cents or 1.8 per cent to $48.81, pulled down by a slide in oil prices yesterday.

***

The escalating value of Fort Hills

In a little over a year, the price buyers have paid to be a part of the planned oil sands mining project at Fort Hills have soared nearly 20-fold. That increase is based on dollars paid per barrel of estimated recoverable bitumen, currently projected at 2.8 billion barrels.


DATE: July 9, 2004
THE DEAL:UTS Energy announces a deal to buy out Koch Industries'
78-per-cent stake in the project.
PRICE ($million)::130.25
SHARE OF PROJECT IN BARRELS OF OIL:2.18 BILLION
PRICE PER BARREL:



DATE:March 1, 2005
THE DEAL:Petro-Canada makes a deal with UTS to buy 60 per cent of Fort Hills. Petrocan becomes the operator of the project.
PRICE ($million)::300
SHARE OF PROJECT IN BARRELS OF OIL:1.68 BILLION
PRICE PER BARREL:18¢



DATE:Sept. 6, 2005
THE DEAL:Teck Cominco buys a 15-per-cent stake in the project from UTS and Petrocan
PRICE ($million)::475
SHARE OF PROJECT IN BARRELS OF OIL:420 BILLION
PRICE PER BARREL:$1.13
Le lien: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/ ... TopStories
What a wonderful world

PiCOle
Kérogène
Kérogène
Messages : 59
Inscription : 17 sept. 2005, 20:49

Message par PiCOle » 18 sept. 2005, 18:06

De toutes facons ils ne prevoient pas plus d'un million de barriles par jour et ce pas avant 20 ans.

"Consequently, at least 12 and possibly more years will elapse before oil shale development will reach the production growth phase.
Under high growth assumptions, an oil shale production level of 1 million barrels per day is probably more than 20 years in the future, and 3 million barrels per day is probably more than 30 years into the future."

http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/200 ... 14.sum.pdf
The illusion of freedom will continue as long as it's profitable for them to continue the illusion.

fabinoo

Message par fabinoo » 18 sept. 2005, 19:42

Encore faut-il que dans 20 ans ils trouvent assez de gaz et d'eau pour assurer la separation du sable et du bitume.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
mahiahi
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 5642
Inscription : 14 sept. 2004, 14:01
Localisation : Yvelines

Message par mahiahi » 18 sept. 2005, 19:53

Le gaz est plus abondant que le pétrole, quite à faire un gazoduc des USA vers le Canada, ils en auront d'autant plus facilement que le pétrole sera rare ; quant à l'eau, la désertification ne menace pas le Canada!

fabinoo

Message par fabinoo » 18 sept. 2005, 20:11

Sauf erreur de ma part, les Etats-Unis sont deja importateurs de gaz, ca m'etonnerait bien que ca se soit ameliore dans 20 ans. Et la penurie guette des aujourd'hui l'amerique du nord. Quant a importer du gaz d'autres continents, ils sont pas sortis de l'auberge.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
mahiahi
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 5642
Inscription : 14 sept. 2004, 14:01
Localisation : Yvelines

Message par mahiahi » 18 sept. 2005, 20:41

Mais ils vont exploiter les gisements d'Alaska, or l'Alaska est près du Canada
Par ailleurs, ils sont importateurs de gaz : cela signifie qu'ils en consomment plus qu'ils n'en produisent, mais pas qu'ils n'en ont pas du tout!
Entre se priver de gaz et se priver de pétrole...

Avatar de l’utilisateur
energy_isere
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 58120
Inscription : 24 avr. 2005, 21:26
Localisation : Les JO de 68, c'était la
Contact :

Message par energy_isere » 18 sept. 2005, 22:26

PiCOle a écrit :De toutes facons ils ne prevoient pas plus d'un million de barriles par jour et ce pas avant 20 ans.

"Consequently, at least 12 and possibly more years will elapse before oil shale development will reach the production growth phase.
Under high growth assumptions, an oil shale production level of 1 million barrels per day is probably more than 20 years in the future, and 3 million barrels per day is probably more than 30 years into the future."

http://www.rand.org/pubs/monographs/200 ... 14.sum.pdf
les amis, confondez pas les "oil sands" qui sont les sables bitumineux
et le "oil shales" qui sont les schistes bitumineux.

les premiers sont en majorité au Canada et sont DEJA à une production supérieure à 1 million de barril/jour.

Les seconds ( oil shale) ont des reserves énormes aus USA, et effectivement j'avais lu par ailleurs qu'il fallait 20 ans pour arriver au million de barril/jour. Les expériences qui avaient été tentées au début des années 80 avaient du étre stoppées quand le barril avait redescendu brutalement. Les industriel avaient bien bu le bouillon et s'en souviennent encore. 8-)

PiCOle
Kérogène
Kérogène
Messages : 59
Inscription : 17 sept. 2005, 20:49

Message par PiCOle » 18 sept. 2005, 23:05

Autant pour moi :oops:

Merci de cette rectification :)
The illusion of freedom will continue as long as it's profitable for them to continue the illusion.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
mahiahi
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 5642
Inscription : 14 sept. 2004, 14:01
Localisation : Yvelines

Message par mahiahi » 18 sept. 2005, 23:08

Pareil!
J'ai encore appris quelque chose :-)

fabinoo

Message par fabinoo » 19 sept. 2005, 10:35

"Oil sands", "oil shales", tout ca c'est la meme famille des "oil shit", alors hein, on va pas chipoter :-D

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Roland
Charbon
Charbon
Messages : 259
Inscription : 20 mars 2005, 02:10
Localisation : 35, Rennes

Message par Roland » 19 sept. 2005, 10:42

energy_isere a écrit : les amis, confondez pas les "oil sands" qui sont les sables bitumineux
et le "oil shales" qui sont les schistes bitumineux.
J'avais déjà dû envoyer le lien il y a 6 mois, le revoilà :
http://www.drexel.edu/coe/enggeo/rocks3/oil_shale.JPG

C'est un bloc de schiste bitumineux. Faut un peu d'imagination pour voir couler le pétrole... Et en voici un gisement :
http://www.mines.edu/research/ceri/imag ... %20bed.jpg

Faut encore plus d'imagination...

fabinoo

Message par fabinoo » 19 sept. 2005, 11:16

On ne voit bien qu'avec le coeur, l'essentiel est invisible pour les yeux !


...

Avatar de l’utilisateur
energy_isere
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 58120
Inscription : 24 avr. 2005, 21:26
Localisation : Les JO de 68, c'était la
Contact :

Message par energy_isere » 19 sept. 2005, 12:34

fabinoo a écrit :"Oil sands", "oil shales", tout ca c'est la meme famille des "oil shit", alors hein, on va pas chipoter :-D
je precise davantage pour qu'il y ait pas d'amalgame :

Oil sands au Canada : le pétrole est "mur", il faut <<l'extraire>> du sable par séparation du sable et l'eau. Ensuite il est expédiable par pipeline moyennant un peu de solvant pour baisser la viscosité.
Ca serait un peu comme presser un panier d'olive en chauffant un peu .

Oil shale aux USA : le pétole n'est meme pas mur. On parle de "kérogéne". Il faut chauffer à haute température la caillasse schisteuse pour effectuer artificiellement et de maniére extrémement accelerée ce que la nature avait fait pour le pétrole par le couple pression x temperature sur les matiéres organiques enfouies dans le sol.
Le bilan energétique est encore moins bon qu'avec les sable bitumineux.
Et comme il faut chauffer bien plus qu'avec les sables, à moins d'utiliser l"energie nucléaire, on rejette du CO2 en utilisant encore de l'energie fossile dans le processus.
A ce jour il n'existe pas d'installation industrielle qui traite les oil shales.

C'est donc shits bien différents. Si les oils sands était des feuilles de Canabis, les oil shales serait de la coke bien rafinée.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
mahiahi
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 5642
Inscription : 14 sept. 2004, 14:01
Localisation : Yvelines

Message par mahiahi » 19 sept. 2005, 14:12

energy_isere a écrit : C'est donc shits bien différents. Si les oils sands était des feuilles de Canabis, les oil shales serait de la coke bien rafinée.
:lol:
Voilà une image parlante!
;-)

Avatar de l’utilisateur
GillesH38
Hydrogène
Hydrogène
Messages : 13188
Inscription : 10 sept. 2005, 17:07
Localisation : Berceau de la Houille Blanche !
Contact :

Message par GillesH38 » 19 sept. 2005, 16:15

Je pense que les raffineries devraient engager des percepteurs pour arriver à en extraire quelque chose, de ces schistes .....

Drole d'idée qu'ils ont les économistes, de dire qu'il n'y a pas de problème, quand le pétrole sera devenu très cher, ça deviendra rentable d'exploiter les gisements non conventionnels. Alors si on manque de blé, c'est pas grave, on le remplacera par du caviar quand il sera devenu moins cher !

Répondre