[Charbon] L'ascension du charbon

Modérateurs : Rod, Modérateurs

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Sylvain
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 1836
Inscription : 17 déc. 2004, 08:34

Message par Sylvain » 23 avr. 2005, 10:43

Et on parle d'utiliser / de produire du charbon en Grande-Bretagne et en Alemagne, sans oublier l'ogre chinois ...

Pauvre humanité, qui gaspille des ressources limitées pour atteindre une illusion de bonheur dans le matérialisme, sacrifiant au passage l'écosystème de ses enfants Image Ça fout le cafard. Misère ... Qu'est-ce qu'on va laisser à nos gamins ?

Sinon, l'article contient des liens vers d'autres articles intéressants.

Le tête-à-queue de l'Allemagne (dans le domaine du charbon)
L'étroite dépendance (envers le charbon) de la Chine
Du coke à l'acier (fabrication de l'acier)

Avatar de l’utilisateur
energy_isere
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 59747
Inscription : 24 avr. 2005, 21:26
Localisation : Les JO de 68, c'était la
Contact :

L'ascension du charbon

Message par energy_isere » 20 nov. 2005, 23:11

Réouverture d'une mine dans l'UTAH qui avait fermé il y seulement 2 ans. 40 millions de $ injectés.

Il est rapelé que le charbon est à l'origine de la moité de l'életricité des USA et que c'est largement moins cher qu'avec le gaz et le pétrole.
High prices spur coal rush
By Christopher Leonard
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ST. LOUIS — Good times are back at the Skyline coal mine in Helper, Utah.

Arch Coal Inc. closed the mine and laid off 200 workers two years ago, when coal was just too cheap to justify extracting. But a mini coal boom is changing all that. St. Louis-based Arch is investing about $40 million to reopen the mine, and local miners are lining up for work.

"We're in about as good a condition as we've been in some time," said Delynn Fielding, director of economic development for Carbon County, where the mine is located.

Fielding's words could apply to the coal industry overall. Companies such as Arch have seen surging profits and record-high stock prices. Expansion plans are in the works, from new coal mines to coal-fired power plants. In Washington, a new energy bill has lessened the fear of regulatory hurdles for future coal burning.

But while consumers pay close attention to gasoline prices, few follow the market for a rocky fuel that generates about half of the nation's electricity.

"For whatever reason, (coal is) not in the forefront of people's minds when they think about energy," said Fred Freme, a coal industry researcher with the U.S. Energy Information Administration. "But without it, half the lights in the country would go out."

Coal is in the limelight this fall since increased demand and tight supply have pushed up prices, said Mark Reichman, an analyst with A.G. Edwards & Sons Inc. in St. Louis. Prices rose thanks to factors ranging from a train wreck last spring to economic growth in China, he said.

The price of a futures contract for a ton of coal in the Western United States rose from about $9 in June to $19.50 in October, and that's no blip, Reichman said.

"I think maybe we are entering a little bit of a new price range for coal," he said.

The benefit is clear for the nation's two biggest coal companies. The largest, Peabody Energy Corp., reported a 141 percent increase in profits during the third quarter. Arch reported a 75 percent increase.


Demand up, train wreck

Globally, the coal supply tightened two years ago when China switched from exporting coal to importing to feed its own energy needs, said Rich Bonskowski, a geologist with the Energy Information Administration of the U.S. Department of Energy. Coal consumers in Europe, the United States and India are bidding up prices on supplies from smaller producers such as Australia and South Africa, he said.
Supplies in the United States tightened further in May when two trains derailed on a track that carried roughly 370 million tons of coal annually, about a third of the nation's supply. Shipments will remain hindered until December, Bonskowski said.

The derailment had an outsized impact because utility companies hadn't built up coal reserves last year, expecting the price to drop, Bonskowski said. With winter around the corner and electricity demand expected to rise, utility companies now have little choice but to buy coal on the open market, he said.

But coal remains a far cheaper energy source, Bonskowski said. In July, it cost about $17 to generate a megawatt of electricity for an hour using coal. It cost $59 to generate the same energy with natural gas and $64 with liquid fuels such as kerosene, Bonskowski said.

Coal carries hidden costs, such as the price of complying with air pollution rules; but as long as the price remains lower than other energy sources, it will be attractive to utilities, he said.


Stocks rise

Coal companies are ramping up efforts to meet the demand and cash in on higher prices.
Arch executives have outlined $400 million worth of investment to open and expand mines from West Virginia to Utah, and Peabody's management has announced expansion plans that could generate 75 million tons of coal in five years.

Peabody's stock hit a record high Oct. 3 when it closed at $86.12 per share on the New York Stock exchange. Arch soon followed when its stock hit an all-time high Nov. 3, closing at $80.31. Although they remain at historical highs, both stocks have declined since that time, with Peabody trading at $72 per share Tuesday and Arch trading near $69 per share.

New federal law, such as the 2005 Energy Policy Act passed in August, is paving the way for coal's expanded use, Bonskowski said. The biggest regulatory changes are geared toward the electric utility plants, which consume about 90 percent of all coal in the United States, he said.

The energy bill sets a limit on the plants' emissions but gives utility companies wide discretion for meeting the limits, Bonskowski said. If a utility can't meet the standard, it can pay the government for extra emissions.

The energy bill doesn't mean it will be a free-for-all when it comes to building coal plants. Peabody has faced stiff opposition from the Sierra Club and other environmental groups as it presses forward with new power plants in the Midwest.

In Kentucky, the Sierra Club filed a request with state authorities asking them to review Peabody's plans to build a new power plant. The move has stalled a regulatory process that Peabody began in 2002.

The Sierra Club plans to resist new coal plants where they are proposed nationwide because emissions from the plants increase cases of asthma and other respiratory diseases, said spokesman Brendan Bell.

"If even a fraction of these (power) plants get built," Bell said, "we will be stuck with these plants for 30 or 40 years."

11/16/05
Dernière modification par energy_isere le 20 avr. 2006, 12:49, modifié 1 fois.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
energy_isere
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 59747
Inscription : 24 avr. 2005, 21:26
Localisation : Les JO de 68, c'était la
Contact :

Re: La relance du charbon

Message par energy_isere » 22 nov. 2005, 13:17

Aux US le mineurs de charbons redeviennent trés demandé et les salaires/avantages augmentent.

Quand est ce que les virés de chez Ford et GM iront se reconvertir à la mine ?

http://deseretnews.com/dn/view/0,1249,635162790,00.html
Coal industry labor shortage giving benefits to workers
By Erik Schelzig
Associated Press
CHARLESTON, W.Va. — Caught between strong demand and an ongoing labor shortage, some coal producers are offering pay hikes, improved benefits and bonuses in an effort to attract new miners — and to keep existing employees from being raided by competitors.
"Companies are almost bidding for the experienced miner right now," said Bill Raney, president of the West Virginia Coal Association. "There's a lot of innovations that are being developed in the industry."
At Richmond, Va.-based Massey Energy Co., Central Appalachia's largest coal operator, electricians who sign a noncompete clause earn $25,000 in bonuses over three years.
Massey, which has increased its work force by 1,100 to about 5,600 since the beginning of 2003, has also developed several other measures to attract and keep its workers, such as zero-premium health insurance; a heath center closer to where most of its miners work; and discounted auto and home insurance policies.
Still, more than half of Massey's new employees are leaving before their first year on the job. And half of them are taking jobs with competitors.
Speaking at a recent investors' conference, Massey Chief Operating Officer Chris Adkins likened the movement of miners between producers to a "round robin play." When a competitor hires away an experienced worker, like an operator of mining machinery, "we immediately and go and hire a miner operator back from another guy," he said.
The prolonged surge in coal demand — spot prices for some types of Appalachian coal have doubled since 2002 — has led companies to reopen shuttered mines and add new ones. Sixty-nine mines opened in the region last year, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.
Coal fuels more than half of all electricity generated in the United States, and Appalachia's 390 million tons of coal represented about 35 percent of total U.S. production last year, according to the EIA.
Eastern coal executives openly acknowledge that the labor shortage is affecting their ability to hit production targets, said Luke Popovich, a spokesman for the National Mining Association. The most recent trough in coal demand left the cupboard bare when demand for labor started ramping up again.
"We sort of had a generation of mining people who simply weren't being recruited and that same phenomenon was being observed in mining schools," said Popovich. "Now that you need them, you've got fewer eligible miners and engineers."
It isn't always the promise of better compensation that lures away miners, said Mike Quillen, president and CEO of Abingdon, Va.-based Alpha Natural Resources.
"A lot of us in the coal industry were driving an hour, hour-and-a-half one way to the mines and some mines have reopened closer back to where these people were located," he said. "They were able to put two to three hours back into their personal life.
"You really can't do anything with wages and benefits" to change that, he said.
Northern Appalachian coal mines, like those operated in northern West Virginia and Pennsylvania by Pittsburgh-based Consol Energy Inc., have thicker coal seams that are better suited for longwall mining — an automated technique that extracts more coal using fewer workers. So the labor shortage in that region has been less acute, said Consol CEO Brett Harvey.
"In the '70s, we mined 65 million tons of coal with 23,000 people," Harvey said in a conference call with analysts. "This year we will mine (around) 70 million tons of coal . . . with about 7,800 people."
"So the need to replace these people is not as great," he said. "But . . . we need more technical people."
While there is also a high demand for technical workers in the Western coal fields, the shortage there hasn't reached a level where it is affecting production, said Marion Loomis, the executive director of the Wyoming Mining Association. Wyoming is the country's top coal producer, mostly from surface mines.
Holding on to new underground coal miners is a particular challenge, because of the difficult working conditions and the more specific skills that need to be developed, officials said.
"(With) surface mining employees, you do have other industries and locations that those skills can come from," said Alpha's Quillen. "The real difficulty that I'm talking about is in our undergrounding, which there is really just not a lot of other industries that train people."
Training new workers at Massey surface mines, where some skills overlap with construction jobs, takes about two months, but it can take underground miners between six to 18 months to come up to speed.
"What's driving the turnover underground is the number of apprentice miners, and really there's not a practice coal mine to go and try to see if you like coal mining," said Jeff Gillenwater of Massey's human resources department. "And some of the workers in the industry just don't care for that type of mining."
Alpha has seen some success in getting new employees to join the company, said Quillen, but has struggled to advance miners into senior slots.
"We now need to concentrate on supervisory development to encourage some of our 30 and younger (and) 40-year-old people to move into the supervisory ranks, because it does take an experienced person to do that," he said. "And I don't see that issue in the industry getting any easier."

Avatar de l’utilisateur
rico
Hydrogène
Hydrogène
Messages : 6358
Inscription : 21 sept. 2005, 15:00
Localisation : 92

Message par rico » 22 nov. 2005, 14:42

et ça va être comme ça pendant encore 230 ans!!!!!!

Avatar de l’utilisateur
energy_isere
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 59747
Inscription : 24 avr. 2005, 21:26
Localisation : Les JO de 68, c'était la
Contact :

Message par energy_isere » 05 déc. 2005, 18:25

L' Australie premier exportateur de charbon au monde :

Australia coal boom cools as price cuts loom
Mon Dec 5, 2005
By Michael Byrnes
SYDNEY (Reuters) - Billions of dollars worth of coal from Australia, the world's biggest exporter, face price cuts of up to 25 percent next year as Asian buyers chop back stunning 2005/06 price rises, industry experts said on Monday.

This would dampen, but not kill, a boom for Australian coal, a main raw material for Asian blast furnace steel mills and coal-fired power stations, they said as price negotiations for 2006/07 proceed in Tokyo.

In an interview with Reuters at McCloskey's Australian Coal Forecasting Conference, convenor and analyst Gerard McCloskey forecast contract price cuts of around 24 percent for power generating thermal coal in the Japanese fiscal year beginning April 1.

Steelmaking coking coal prices, more difficult to forecast, were seen emerging between unchanged rollover prices and cuts of around 16 percent, he said.

Top broker analyst Peter O'Connor of Credit Suisse First Boston forecast an average price cut of 12 percent for coking coal and of between 7.5 percent and 26 percent for thermal coal.

Sensitivities are running high as talks continue over A$25 billion a year worth of Australian coal, the country's biggest export and a major import item for industrialized North Asia.

"I would be dismissed instantly and probably sued if I gave a forecast of price," said Andrew Offen, marketing director of carbon steel materials at the biggest coking coal exporter in the world, BHP Billiton Ltd./Plc. (BHP.AX: Quote, Profile, Research) (BLT.L: Quote, Profile, Research).

Offen, McCloskey and O'Connor all agree that demand for coal will stay strong in Asia in 2006/07.

But this will not stop last year's unprecedented price rises of around 120 percent for coking coal and 20 percent for thermal coal being pared back in negotiations with the Japanese steel mills, for coking coal, and power stations, for thermal coal.

Last year's big price gains were set in a scramble by Asian producers for raw materials as powerful demand by China's steel industry for iron ore helped fuel shortage fears over coal.

China began to import coking coal as it also diverted exports of thermal coal back into its own market.
"This really geriatric market creaked into a new world," McCloskey said of the export trade in coking coal, in which prices are set in annual negotiations in Tokyo between Australian producers and the Japanese steel mills.

NO PANIC

This year, Asian buyers are attempting to cool markets by slowing the pace of talks over next year's price contracts.

"There's no pressure, no urgency, there's not the panic of last year," McCloskey said.

Price forecasts for thermal coal in 2006/07 are based primarily on an active spot market, where prices have recently been struck at US$39.50 a ton ex Australia's main thermal coal port of Newcastle, versus the 2005/06 contract price of $54.

The spot market is down from $41.90 a month ago and $51.15 a year ago. A South African spot sale at $44, struck last Friday, indicated the market may have just bottomed, McCloskey said.

Price forecasts for coking coal are based partly on scattered spot deals, which are much rarer than for thermal coal, as well as on increased tonnages elicited by last year's big price rise.

Colin Gubbins, head of consulting at the McCloskey group, shows in a conference paper that Australian hard coking coal exports have risen to 80.62 million tonnes in 2005 from 72.99 million tonnes in 2004, while Canadian coking coal exports are up to 26.98 million tonnes from 24.04 million. U.S. coal exports have risen to 22.57 million from 20.90 million.

Now a big increase in expensive U.S. coal sold to Asia in 2004 -- "because of the panic among Asian steel producers" -- has dropped off to help slow the price fall, McCloskey said.

Coal price gains in 2005 far outstripped gains made in almost all other commodity classes -- ferrous, non-ferrous and precious metals, noted O'Connor.

Coking coal prices would not rise through $125 in 2006/07, but would hold above $100 a ton, he said. "It's still a very buoyant market."

Avatar de l’utilisateur
energy_isere
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 59747
Inscription : 24 avr. 2005, 21:26
Localisation : Les JO de 68, c'était la
Contact :

Message par energy_isere » 16 déc. 2005, 21:40

Le charbon Anglais redevient rentable. Voila au moins une compagnie (UK coal) qui profite de l'augmentation du prix du gaz en Grande Bretagne.
UK Coal celebrates first profit in a decade
Dec 15 2005

Daily Post

PITS run by the UK's biggest coal producer are making money for the first time in a decade.

UK Coal, which owns the former assets of British Coal, said its deep mines returned to profitability in the three months to November, helped by higher selling prices and new working practices designed to boost efficiency.

The Doncaster-based business has seven deep mines, although two are due to be mothballed next year. The portfolio made losses of £37.8m in 2004, following a drop in output to 12m tonnes.

UK Coal said its five continuing deep mines were expected to return to overall profitability in 2006, although this was dependent on the continuation of mining conditions experienced in the latter part of this year.

Selling prices in the past five months were £1.36 per gigajoule, compared with £1.30 in the first half of the year. Costs per unit, which have spiralled in recent years because of geological problems at some sites, have been reduced to £1.30 per gigajoule.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
MadMax
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 2990
Inscription : 12 août 2005, 08:58
Localisation : Dans un cul-de-sac gazier

Message par MadMax » 25 déc. 2005, 21:41

GÉNÉRALITÉS
Avantages. Énergie fossile la plus abondante et la mieux répartie. La pollution est aujourd'hui mieux maîtrisée [Allemagne, USA : des usines de lavage des fumées limitent les émissions d'azote et de soufre ; projet de gazéification du charbon (coût élevé)].

Formation. Il y a 250 à 300 millions d'années (période carbonifère à la fin de l'ère primaire), la forêt hercynienne, aux arbres géants, aux fougères arborescentes, couvrait de vastes étendues. Les débris végétaux (bois, écorces, feuilles, spores, algues microscopiques) se sont accumulés et ont été recouverts, par suite de phénomènes de subsidence, par un faible niveau d'eau. Ces dépôts, au gré des fluctuations de la subsidence, ont été recouverts de sédiments argileux ou sableux, puis des alluvions s'y sont ajoutées. Enfermé à l'abri de l'air, le dépôt végétal a fermenté et s'est enrichi en carbone. Ces débris végétaux se sont accumulés sur place dans des dépressions (sédiments autochtones) ou ont pu être transportés par des cours d'eau qui les ont déposés au fond de grands bassins sédimentaires (dépôts allochtones).

Types de bassins. Paraliques : en bordure des mers, dans des plaines basses (Nord, Pas-de-Calais). Limniques (ou intra-montagneux) : plus étroits et moins étendus, se caractérisent souvent par des affaissements plus marqués (centre et midi de la France). Le bassin de Lorraine est plus grand car formé dans de vastes zones de sédimentation séparées de la mer par un seuil continental.

Composition du charbon en %. Humidité 1,2, cendres 7,3, carbone « total » 78, hydrogène 5, oxygène 6,4, azote 1,4, soufre 0,7.

Différents charbons. On pense que les charbons dérivent les uns des autres, mais la question n'est pas tranchée : des terrains primaires recèlent des lignites, des houilles se trouvent dans des terrains secondaires. Anthracite : massive, homogène, teneur en matières volatiles très réduite, dure, cassure brillante. Coke : obtenu en calcinant la houille dans des fours à plus de 1 000 oC pendant 12 à 18 h. Dépourvu des produits volatils de la houille, il brûle sans fumée ni odeur. Coke métallurgique : utilisé dans les hauts fourneaux, très compact, fournit environ 7 000 kilocalories et laisse peu de cendres. Classification (en mm) : 10/20 ; 20/40 ; 40/60 ; 60/90. Graphite : carbone naturel cristallisé. Ses gisements dérivent pour la grande majorité du métamorphisme de couches charbonneuses. Se trouve à l'état de paillettes (cristallisé) ou finement divisé (amorphe ou cryptocristallin). On obtient du graphite artificiel à partir du charbon ou du coke de pétrole. Utilisation : creuset et moule pour fonderie (variété cristalline) ; aciers spéciaux, lubrifiants, piles et crayons. Houille : terme général désignant diverses variétés de charbon. Les principaux gisements datent de l'ère primaire. Au microscope, fragments d'écorces, tissus ligneux, feuilles et spores, noyés dans une masse fondamentale, sorte de gelée. Riche en carbone. Teneur en cendres, matières volatiles et eau, variable selon gisements. Lignite : noir, brun noirâtre, parfois brun. Les principaux gisements sont de formation tertiaire. Structure fibreuse plus homogène que la tourbe, laisse apparaître des rameaux et de grosses branches. Plus riche en carbone que la tourbe, mais teneur en matières volatiles élevée, combustible assez médiocre. Tourbe : extraite des tourbières : marais couverts d'une végétation hygrophile, de mousses en particulier ; noirâtre ou brune, fibreuse, retenant fortement l'eau, de formation quaternaire. Elle contient peu de carbone. Après dessiccation, sa combustion dégage beaucoup de fumée, peu de chaleur et laisse des résidus importants.

Classification des charbons. Catégories (% de matières volatiles) : anthracite - de 8, maigres anthraciteux 8 à 14, 1/4 gras 12 à 16, 1/2 gras 14 à 22, gras à courte flamme ou 3/4 gras 18 à 27, gras proprement dit 27 à 40, flambants gras + de 30, secs + de 34. Calibre (dimensions en mm) : gros calibres 80 × 120 ; gailletins 50 × 80 ; noix 30 × 50 ; noisettes 20 × 30 ou 15 × 30 ; braisettes 10 × 20 ou 10 × 15 ; grains 6 × 10. Pouvoir calorifique (en millithermies sur brut) : anthracites 7 050, maigres 7 815, 1/4 gras 7 080, 1/2 gras 7 680, gras 7 250, flambants gras 7 120, secs 6 770, ligniteux 5 850. Ces classifications divergent légèrement de bassin à bassin, pour tenir compte des usages. Les maigres sont utilisés surtout dans les fours à feu continu. Les flambants permettent de donner des « coups de feu ». Plus il y a de matières volatiles, plus le charbon brûle vite.

TYPES D'EXPLOITATION
Mine souterraine. Le charbon est extrait par creusement de galeries à l'intérieur du sol jusqu'à la veine. Celle-ci est exploitée à l'aide de matériel d'extraction souterrain (haveuses et rabots dans les exploitations par longue taille, machines en continu dans les chantiers en dressants ou dans les exploitations par chambres et piliers). L'accès aux veines à exploiter se fait par puits et galeries (inclinées ou non) en rocher, ou par descenderie (plan d'accès incliné, débouchant au jour). Profondeur maximale : 1 000 à 1 300 m. Rendement (fond) [en t par mineur et par heure, 1994] : USA 1,6 (en 1990). G.-B. 1,4. Allemagne 0,7. France 0,6. RECORDS (juin 1988) : France : Reumaux 8 000 t/j. Allemagne : Walsum 4 800 t/j.

Mine à ciel ouvert (ou

découverte). L'exploitation est généralement entre 10 et 400 m de la surface du sol. Les couches de terre recouvrant ou entourant le charbon (morts-terrains) sont décapées pour mettre à nu la veine de charbon, qui est exploitée avec des engins de chantier. Rendement en t (par mineur et par poste, en 1987) : USA et Australie 33. Pourcentage de production : 1970 : mines souterraines 60, à ciel ouvert 40 ; 1993 : 78/22.

Nouvelles exploitations. Gisement de charbon souterrain : il doit contenir au moins 50 millions de t de réserves planifiables. Les investissements sont d'environ 3 milliards de F pour une production annuelle de 2 millions de t. Le délai entre l'exploration et la mise en production est, en général, de 10 ans. Mines à ciel ouvert : l'exploitation peut être envisagée si, pour 1 t de charbon vendue (soit 1 m3 de minerai brut avant lavage), il ne faut pas avoir à enlever plus de 10 m3 (soit 24 à 25 t) de terrains de couverture.

Terrils : entassement (parfois de 50 à 100 m de haut.) des déchets de la mine : pierres et terres, stériles (morceaux de charbon non minéralisés) rejetés après triage et lavage, cendres et scories des chaudières. Certains sont aménagés et plantés. D'autres, contenant jusqu'à près de 20 % de produits « mixtes » sont repris et relavés. Ils fournissent 1 500 000 t de produits cendreux pour centrales thermiques. D'autres sont exploités pour fabriquer des matériaux de construction (briques surschistes) et dans les travaux publics (fondations d'autoroutes, etc.).

Réserves. Techniquement et économiquement exploitables au coût actuel dans le monde, elles représentent 80 % de l'ensemble des énergies fossiles (10 386 milliards de t), soit 7 fois plus que le gaz et que le pétrole. En prévoyant une croissance annuelle régulière de 2,8 %, les réserves exploitables sont suffisantes pour 250 ans.

STATISTIQUES
Effectifs inscrits au fond (moyenne annuelle de 1996 et, entre parenthèses, 1960) : Allemagne 55 300 (309 000). Espagne 21 300. G.-B. 11 300 (482 300). France 5 700 (130 600). Portugal 0. Belgique 0 (77 300). P.-Bas 0 (28 800). Italie 0 (2 600). Irlande 0 (1 200).

Combustibles solides. Réserves (en millions de tep, fin 2004) : USA 246,6, Russie 157, Chine 114,5, Inde 92,4, Australie 78,5, Afr. du S. 48,8, Amér. du S. 21,1, Pologne 14, Allemagne 6,7, Canada 6,6, Rép. tchèque 5,6, Indonésie 5, Espagne 0,5, Proche-Orient 0,4, G.-B. 0,2, Corée du S. 0,1. Total monde 909,1. Production (en millions de tep, fin 2004) : Chine 989,8, USA 567,2, Australie 199,4, Inde 188,8, Afr. du S. 136,9, Russie 127,6, Indonésie 81,4, Pologne 69,8, Allemagne 54,7, Amér. du S. 48,4, Canada 34,9, Rép. tchèque 23,5, G.-B. 15,3, Espagne 6,7, Corée du Sud 1,5, France 0,5, Proche-Orient 0,4. Total monde : 2 732,1. Consommation (en millions de tep, fin 2004) : Chine 956,9, USA 564,3, Inde 204,8, Japon 120,8, Russie 105,9, Afr. du S. 94,5, Allemagne 85,7, Pologne 57,7, G.-B. 38,1, Canada 31, Amér. du S. 25,5, Espagne 21,1, France 12,5,, Belgique-Lux. 6,1. Total monde : 2 778,2.

Transport. Le charbon peut être transporté par pipe-lines [carboducs : sous forme de fines particules diluées dans une solution liquide (petites distances)], voie fluviale (péniche ou barge), train ou bateau. De nombreux ports pourront recevoir et décharger les navires minéraliers de 100 000 à 200 000 tpl.

Exportations (en millions de t, 1996). 478,2 [dont Australie 140,4, USA 83, Afr. du Sud 59,5, Indonésie 36,4, Canada 34,5, Chine 29,5, Pologne 29, Colombie 23] ; 2010 (prév.) : 630.

L'Afrique du Sud disposant d'une main-d'œuvre bon marché « fait » les cours internationaux. L'Australie (main-d'œuvre fortement syndiquée) suit, mais à perte. L'Allemagne verse une aide d'environ 41 milliards de F en faveur de son charbon s'appuyant sur : 1o) le Jahrhundert Vertrag ou « contrat du siècle », qui oblige les producteurs d'électricité allemands à enlever 40 millions de t de charbon/an (contrainte prise en charge par les utilisateurs de courant et par des aides publiques) ; 2o) le Kohlen-pfennig : taxe parafiscale supportée par les consommateurs (montant : 7,5 à 8 %). Ce système qui maintenait en activité des puits non rentables a été remplacé le 1-1-1996 par une subvention globale.

Perspectives. Procédés de cokéfaction qui permettraient d'utiliser des charbons de moins bonne qualité : gazéification souterraine (grâce à 2 puits percés à faible distance) pour obtenir un substitut au gaz naturel, le gaz naturel de synthèse (GNS) par combustion directe dans la veine et récupération du gaz ainsi produit. Production de gaz (méthane) par dégazage des veines à action de forages et « fracting » du charbon. Liquéfaction et gazéification en surface permettant de fabriquer carburants ou fluides susceptibles d'être brûlés dans les chaudières ou transformés dans la chimie.

Production d'essence à partir de houille : Allemagne 1939-45 : 5 millions de t/an d'essence à partir de la houille. Actuellement, l'unité pilote de BASF et Mines de Sarre produit 3 t d'hydrocarbures à partir de 6 t de houille. Afrique du Sud : à Sasol 230 000 t d'essence.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
energy_isere
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 59747
Inscription : 24 avr. 2005, 21:26
Localisation : Les JO de 68, c'était la
Contact :

Message par energy_isere » 27 déc. 2005, 16:37

un article des USA :


http://www.indystar.com/apps/pbcs.dll/a ... 60318/1002
Abundant coal can play major role December 26, 2005

Don't expect high natural gas prices, which are pushing up home heating bills, to fall anytime soon.
Natural gas is in great demand around the world, a fact that should elevate prices for at least the rest of this decade.
Although higher prices should spur further exploration and production, North American well fields are aging. That means a greater reliance on liquefied natural gas, which is expensive to handle and distribute. And in growing demand internationally.
All of this means the U.S. should invest more in the most abundant supply of fuel available: coal.
Coal represents 85 percent of the nation's energy reserves. New technologies involving gasification of coal enable it to be burned with little pollution.
Cinergy and Vectren have proposed building a coal gasification plant that would generate four times as much energy while emitting less than a third of the pollutants as the 60-year-old conventional coal power plant in Knox County it would replace. Gov. Mitch Daniels recently signed an agreement with Illinois to jointly bid for a $1 billion clean-coal project involving a state-of-the-art, emissions free coal-based power plant in Illinois with underground carbon dioxide sequestration in Indiana.
Both developments ought to be accelerated.
Turning to coal could make the nation less reliant on foreign fuel markets, improve its security and balance of trade, and ease pressure on natural gas supplies.
With 204 years worth of reserves available worldwide, coal also could provide a bridge to the energy technologies of the future, including solar and hydrogen.

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Tiennel
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 5020
Inscription : 12 mars 2005, 00:37

Message par Tiennel » 04 janv. 2006, 22:10

204 années c'est un peu optimiste - comme d'habitude venant de ceux qui font l'article du charbon - vu qu'ils raisonnent à croissance nulle de la demande et sans substitution du pétrole vers le charbon.
Cela dit, le charbon reste abondant partout .

La signature de greenchris me paraît de plus en plus pertinente : il n'y aura pas de choc énergétique au moment du Peak Oil, on va d'abord convertir nos économies au gaz le temps de rouvrir les mines, puis au charbon, puis au surgénérateurs. Atomkraft ja bitte !

Tout cela me déprime un peu...
Méfiez-vous des biais cognitifs

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Sylvain
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 1836
Inscription : 17 déc. 2004, 08:34

Message par Sylvain » 04 janv. 2006, 23:17

À propos du procédé de Fischer-Tropsch : voir la présentation d'Édouard Freund de l'IFP qui s'intéresse au sujet, et notamment à son application pour la production de kérosène.
Lien - Fichier PDF de 276 Ko.

3 étapes :
  • 1 - Matière première hydrocarbonée --> Gaz de synthèse
    La matière première hydrocarbonée peut être du gaz naturel, du charbon, ou de la biomasse (en développement). Il faut également une unité de séparation d'air qui produise du dioxygène O2 pur.
    Le gaz de synthèse obtenu est un mélange de CO et de H2.

    2 - La synthèse de Fischer-Tropsch : Gaz de synthèse --> Cires paraffiniques (-CH2-)^n
    190 à 250°C - 10 à 40 bars

    3 - Hydrocraquage isomérisant : Cires paraffiniques (-CH2-)^n --> Produits bruts
    Nécessite du H2
    250 à 350°C - 70 à 80 bars
Il semble qu'il faille y ajouter une étape de finition pour obtenir des hydrocarbures "utilisables" : kérosène et diesel.

Constatation : compte tenu des pressions et des températures nécessaires, il faudrait calculer le rendement énergétique de l'ensemble. L'énergie contenue dans 1 baril d'hydrocarbures obtenus par cete méthode est-elle supérieure à celle investie pour sa production ?

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Schlumpf
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 2384
Inscription : 20 nov. 2005, 12:11
Localisation : Wiesbaden

Message par Schlumpf » 05 janv. 2006, 00:23

Atomkraft ja bitte ? Mais ca va pas non ? D'tout façon, l' Allemagne est sortie du Nucleaire, ELLE !
(enfin elle a décidée qu' elle en sortirait. Peut-être... D'ici vingt ans... ca laisse de la marge...Tout en rallongeant la vie des centrales...dès le premier changement de gourvenement...).

Ahhh la relance du charbon ! Et les TGV à vapeur aussi alors ?

Pour ce qu'il en est de la synthèse Fischer-Tropsch, voici quelques liens:
http://www.g-t-l.biz/
http://www.mpg.de/bilderBerichteDokumen ... 200512141/

En gros ce que dit l'institut Max Planck:

1) cocorico: fischer et tropsch étaient des chercheurs du Max Planck Institut !
2) pendant la 2ème guerre: 600.000 tonnes d'essence par an selon le procédé Fischer-Tropsch
3) l'Afrique du Sud produit à partir de 45 Millions de tonnes de charbon, 28% du diesel+essence du pays.
4) les USA à Gilberton, Pa veulent commencer en 2006 la construction d'une usine de CTL (coal to liquid). Bref de production de diesel à partir du charbon.
Dernière modification par Schlumpf le 05 janv. 2006, 00:33, modifié 1 fois.
L'Homo sapiens se conjugue à la première personne du présent irresponsable...

Avatar de l’utilisateur
Tiennel
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 5020
Inscription : 12 mars 2005, 00:37

Message par Tiennel » 05 janv. 2006, 00:31

Atomkraft ja bitte ? Mais ca va pas non ? D'tout façon, l' Allemagne est sortie du Nucleaire, ELLE !
(enfin elle a décidée qu' elle en sortirait. Peut-être... D'ici vingt ans... ca laisse de la marge...Tout en rallongeant la vie des centrales...dès le premier changement de gourvenement...).

Ahhh la relance du charbon ! Et les TGV à vapeur aussi alors ?
Les TGV... atomiques ! D'ailleurs ils le sont déjà puisqu'alimentés par EDF
Quant à la relance du charbon, elle est inéluctable, malheureusement. sceptique amène effectivement un tas de questions concrètes, mais quand je vois les efforts incroyables déployés pour aller chercher les dernières gouttes des champs de pétrole, je fais le crédit aux Ingénieurs des Mines de trouver des solutions techniques le temps que le gaz russe et iranien s'épuise.
Et ensuite... Rââh lovely ! Des milliers de petits surgénérateurs refroidis au sodium, brillants dans la nuit - Es wird so schön...
Méfiez-vous des biais cognitifs

Avatar de l’utilisateur
greenchris
Gaz naturel
Gaz naturel
Messages : 1233
Inscription : 02 août 2005, 12:00
Localisation : 91 Essonne
Contact :

Message par greenchris » 05 janv. 2006, 12:00

Tiennel a écrit :204 années c'est un peu optimiste - comme d'habitude venant de ceux qui font l'article du charbon - vu qu'ils raisonnent à croissance nulle de la demande et sans substitution du pétrole vers le charbon.
Cela dit, le charbon reste abondant partout .

La signature de greenchris me paraît de plus en plus pertinente : il n'y aura pas de choc énergétique au moment du Peak Oil, on va d'abord convertir nos économies au gaz le temps de rouvrir les mines, puis au charbon, puis au surgénérateurs. Atomkraft ja bitte !

Tout cela me déprime un peu...
Merci. Désolé de te déprimer, pour te consoler, moi aussi, ça me déprime.
Ton scénario me parait maintenant cohérent.
Gaz et charbon, cela laisse le temps d'obtenir des surgénérateurs industrialisables, puis surgénérateurs.
Comme dans ma signature, hélas
:roll:
Le charbon et le gaz prendront sa place (temporairement).
Dans l'ordre, Sobriété, Efficacité et enfin Renouvelables (negawatt).
Attention aux utopies techniques (Global Chance)

Avatar de l’utilisateur
energy_isere
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 59747
Inscription : 24 avr. 2005, 21:26
Localisation : Les JO de 68, c'était la
Contact :

Message par energy_isere » 05 janv. 2006, 12:43

Schlumpf a écrit :Atomkraft ja bitte ? Mais ca va pas non ? D'tout façon, l' Allemagne est sortie du Nucleaire, ELLE !
(enfin elle a décidée qu' elle en sortirait. Peut-être... D'ici vingt ans... ca laisse de la marge...Tout en rallongeant la vie des centrales...dès le premier changement de gourvenement...).
Sclumpf, j'ai lu pas plus tard que ce matin dans les Echos que le "non" au Nucléaire Allemand n'est pas un arrét pur et simple (ca tu le sais), la décision qui avait été prise était de limiter à 32 ans la durée des vie des centrales et de les exploiter tout ce temps.
Mais avec les évenement récents du Gaz rajouté au fait que Angela Merkel voulait reconsiderer le l "arret" du Nucléaire" ils vont peut étre les voir vouloir repenser à exploiter les centrales jusqu' à 40 ans !

Fais nous savoir ce qui sera décidé SVP. :-o

Avatar de l’utilisateur
MadMax
Modérateur
Modérateur
Messages : 2990
Inscription : 12 août 2005, 08:58
Localisation : Dans un cul-de-sac gazier

Message par MadMax » 06 janv. 2006, 16:26

Poutine propose de créer un consortium international pour exploiter les mines de charbon de la Sibérie orientale

11:07 | 06/ 01/ 2006

IAKOUTSK (Russie), 6 janvier - RIA Novosti. Le président russe Vladimir Poutine a appelé vendredi à Iakoutsk, en Sibérie orientale, à la création d'un consortium international contrôlé par l'État pour mettre en valeur le bassin houiller d'Elga.

"Cela doit permettre d'attirer des technologies avancées et des capitaux tout en contrôlant cette ressource prometteuse", a-t-il indiqué lors d'une conférence portant sur le développement socio-économique de la république russe de Iakoutie.

"Rien que les réserves découvertes sont largement supérieures aux besoins de la Iakoutie", a constaté le président, avant de souligner que leur mise en valeur nécessiterait des investissements aussi bien russes qu'étrangers.

Le gisement d'Elga permettra d'extraire d'ici 2010 jusqu'à 30 millions de tonnes de charbon tous les ans.

Répondre