Le recyclage des batteries

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Le recyclage des batteries

Message par energy_isere » 30 avr. 2017, 13:08

Le recyclage des batteries pèse déjà 8.1 milliards de $ en 2016 au niveau mondial.
Devrait monter à 11.6 milliards en 2022.

Multi-billion battery recycling market to reach new heights by 2022

April 28, 2017 by Kirstin Linnenkoper

World: The global battery recycling market will be worth US$ 11.83 billion by 2022, up from US$ 8.10 billion last year. This represents a compound annual growth rate of 6.5% over the next five years.


The lead-acid battery chemistry segment led the Battery Recycling Market in 2016 and is projected to be the fastest-growing segment by 2022, according to new data by Markets and Markets. The extensive usage of starting, lighting, and ignition (SLI) batteries and VRLA batteries has further fuelled the growth of the market.

A different report providing a forecast about the same topic claims that growth in the international battery recycling sector may even be as high as 10.96% during the period 2017-2021. This increase is mainly due to the widening lithium supply-demand gap as well as more and more strict legislation support for battery recycling, points out the publication by 360 Market Updates.
http://www.recyclinginternational.com/r ... ights-2022

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Re: Le recyclage des batteries

Message par energy_isere » 21 août 2018, 20:12

Le Michigan Technological University affirme pouvoir recycler les batteries lithium-ion suivant le procédé décrit ci dessous.
Recycling Li-ion batteries

August 21, 2018

Researchers at Michigan Technological University adapted 20th century mining technologies used to separate metal from ore to improve lithium-ion battery recycling.

The team used mining industry technologies to separate everything in the battery: the casing, metal foils and coatings for the anode and cathode, which includes lithium metal oxide, the most valuable part. The components can be returned to the manufacturer and re-made into new batteries.

The process is also inexpensive and energy efficient.

After trying a range of solvents to liberate the different chemicals, the team turned to water and kerosene.

“We use standard gravity separations to separate copper from aluminum, and we use froth flotation to recover critical materials, including graphite, lithium and cobalt. These mining technologies are the cheapest available, and the infrastructure to implement them already exists,” said Lei Pan, an assistant professor of chemical engineering at Michigan Technological University.

Froth floatation separates hydrophobic and hydrophilic materials. The process involves crushing or grinding a combined material, which is added to water to form a slurry. A collector chemical, in this case kerosene, is added to make the desired material hydrophobic. The slurry is aerated, producing air bubbles to which the hydrophobic material attaches as they rise to the top, forming a froth. The materials remaining in the slurry are referred to as tails or tailings.

In their experiments, the team found that over 90% of anode materials were floated in froth layers, while 10–30% of cathode materials were floated.

The team sees ways to further improve the purity of the separated materials. “For spent lithium-ion batteries, a low purity of cathode materials in tailings might be improved by fine grinding, at which freshly liberated hydrophobic surfaces are exposed and consequently anode materials become floatable,” they said. “The present result confirms that the froth flotation technique is a viable and versatile technique in producing high purity cathode materials from lithium-ion batteries.”
https://semiengineering.com/power-perfo ... ts-aug-21/

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